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Susan M. Heathfield

Top 10 Ways to Encourage Employee Life-Work Balance

By October 7, 2013

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It's not my job as an employer to help my employees balance their work with their life needs. It's the responsibility of the employees.

But, there are ways in which the employer can support and encourage employees to attain the work and life balance that they seek. Probably the most important option that an employer can provide for employees is a flexible work schedule.

A flexible work schedule allows employees to fit other life needs into their day. For example, a mom might choose to arrive at work early so that she can pick her children up at school and shepherd them to after school activities. A dad, in the same family, might choose to come in to work later so that he can deliver the kids to daycare and school. A flexible schedule gives parents and others more options. This is especially appropriate in jobs where specific work hours really don't matter.

While choices such as teleworking are becoming more common, teleworking is not appropriate or possible for evey job. When it is, teleworking is the flexible schedule option that employees value tremendously.

For example, a New York City online publishing company allows employees to telework two days a week. This saves inestimable time, dollars, and commuting stress for employees who live all over the boroughs and even in New Jersey. It enables office collaboration time three days a week. Employee work balance is ensured. Teleworking may be in your employees' future.

If you look creatively at the options you offer for your employees, small changes might help you encourage employee work balance. Here are my top 10 places to start if providing a work environment that allows employees to seek work-life balance is your goal.

Image Copyright Chris Botha

Comments
January 3, 2012 at 9:35 am
(1) Anna Sandoka says:

I am kindly asking for assistance as I am called for an interview as HR data clerk, could please hint on how the interview of this position normaly looks like and what is the best conclusion in the interview

January 3, 2012 at 1:37 pm
(2) Susan Heathfield says:

Hi,

Be yourself. Read back over their job posting and make sure that you are prepared to mention your experience and achievements in areas that involve what they say they are looking for. Study up on the company at their website so that you know about them. All interviews are different. Some are with one person; some are with groups of people. Try to relax and put your best foot forward. Remember that to just get this interview, your credentials and presentation beat out a lot of other people. Prepare questions about the job that you honestly want to ask and ask them at the interview.

I have lots of tips for employers and you might want to take a look at a few of these links:

http://humanresources.about.com/od/jobsearchsites/tp/jobs_in_hr.htm

But, then, head on over to our job searching site for lots of assistance.

http://jobsearch.about.com/od/interviewquestionsanswers/Job_Interview_Questions_and_Answers.htm

Best wishes, Susan

January 11, 2012 at 5:20 am
(3) Katja says:

Thank you for your post!
I think that flexible work schedules can really enhance work-life balance, and they can be beneficial for employer as well. Given careful and good implementation, of course.
I was researching lately on different topics of flexibility and had written some posts on my blog like Annual hours contract: flex your hours .
I hope you don’t mind the link.

January 8, 2013 at 4:07 am
(4) victor iruba says:

Thanks a lot Mrs. Susan Heathfield for the wonderful works you have been doing here to help some employees and some management authority on how to encourage employees to balance life and work in their work place.

October 7, 2013 at 3:18 pm
(5) Tim says:

Love the top 10 guide you created following this post. At the end of the day, it seems that many of the best companies to work for simply treat employees as professional and responsible adults. When treated this way, we tend to have higher levels of engagement and companies experience greater profitabliltiy.

As for your mention of GenY, we had fun conducting some short interviews with some Millennials in downtown Austin, TX. We asked them what happiness at work meant to them. Lots of good learning. Here are a few of the videos if your readers are interested: http://info.youearnedit.com/how-to-engage-millennials

Thanks for all your great articles Susan. Are you at #HRTechConf this week? If so, we would love to say hi.

Tim Ryan
@YouEarnedIt

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