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How to Break Into a Career in Human Resources

Jobs in Human Resources

By

Marks
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Many people are eager to start a career in Human Resources, as it is a fast-growing field with many lucrative opportunities. Career analysts expect the number of HR jobs to increase in the projected future and the median annual income is above the national average.

For these reasons and more, you are probably wondering how to start an HR career of your own. You will find useful information below that will guide you through the process.

Education and Training for a Human Resources Career

There are HR professionals with a wide variety of educational backgrounds. However, many HR positions require candidates with a minimum of a four-year degree. A bachelor's degree in human resources, personnel or some other related subject will offer the best training for an HR career. Such a degree will also be more highly regarded amongst hiring managers.

This is not to imply that current HR professionals without degrees are unsuccessful. Many HR professionals have developed successful careers in Human Resources without degrees. Times are changing in all professional fields, however. If you're starting out or thinking about switching to a career in Human Resources post 2000, you need to obtain a degree.

If you would like to pursue a managerial position or specialized career in HR, some schools offer business degrees that are more focused on a certain area of human resources. Naturally, a graduate-level degree in a related field will help to place you on more hiring shortlists.

Whether you pursue a general HR degree or a more specialized practice within HR, you should be sure to take courses that cover topics such as management, recruitment, training and compensation. Of course, there are many other business courses that relate to the HR field, so an interdisciplinary program is good.

In addition to a college degree, many professionals will have the opportunity to seek certification in certain HR disciplines. In fact, large companies will sometimes offer workshops and classes that broaden an existing professional's HR skills.

By completing a professional certification course, you can increase your earning potential. Examples of certifications include the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) or Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR).

If you are already working in an entry-level HR position, earning a certification could help boost your career. Likewise, it could help you transition from a different department to an HR position.

Finding Work Within the Human Resources Field

Finding a position within the HR industry is similar to finding any other kind of job. There are many online resources for jobseekers, such as About.com's Job Search, Monster, and CareerBuilder.

In addition to those general career sites, however, there are online job board resources that are more specific to the HR field. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), for example, offers a job board that is primarily for HR professionals. Additional job boards specialize in the field of Human Resources.

Some businesses will first look for candidates within the company. Keep this in mind if you are currently working for a large company and wish to enter the HR department. If your company has an internal resource for new positions, such as a private online job board or internal job postings, check regularly for your chance to get your foot in the door.

More candidates for HR jobs are finding their way into HR careers via professional networking and online social networking sites these days, too. If you're still a student, or just out of college, an internship in an HR department can provide the relevant experience you need for your HR job search.

Just like any other profession, finding a career in HR is easiest for those with a college degree in the field and /or professional certification. But, people with related majors in such areas as business, sociology, psychology, and social sciences are also considered, especially for more entry level jobs.

There are many HR positions available and there will be more opportunities in the future. With the proper training and some diligent job seeking, you can join other HR professionals in what is a most lucrative and satisfying career.

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